You don’t need a Harvard MBA or even a college degree to start a business today. It just takes a viable business idea and a little capital to get started. Fortunately, others have paved the way for many of these businesses. You can also purchase inexpensive franchises that will help you succeed. And besides getting started, the key to your success is ambition, discipline and courage, according to Entrepreneur. That said, following are some exciting ventures you can start right out of your house.

Pet Sitting

If you love animals you may enjoy working as a pet sitter. Your potential market is huge, as 68 percent of all U.S. households have pets, according to the Insurance Information Institute. There are a few things that you need to know about pet insurance and liability before starting, as well as some laws to be aware of. Start by calling your local city or county administration office to see if you need a license to get started. You may also need to purchase some business insurance. Contact a few pet sitters in your area to see what they charge, but don’t tell them you’re thinking about getting into the business. Some pet sitters are listed in the online yellow pages. The next step is marketing your services which you can initiate by distributing fliers in your area. Start with several customers and build your clientele by word-of-mouth. Add grooming and dog-walking services to increase your income streams.

Grocery Shopping and Delivery

Grocery shopping and delivering is big business today. Many grocery stores are trying to find ways to make it easier for their shoppers. There are several ways to start a grocery delivery business. You can contact people in your area and charge them to shop and deliver their groceries. Elderly people are prime customers for this type of service because they typically can’t get out as often. You can also contact grocery stores and contract with them to deliver to their customers, according to Chron.com. Another option is to sign up with a reputable grocery shopping service such as WeGoShop. You’ll become an independent contractor which is a less risky avenue toward business ownership.

Lawn or Landscaping Service

It takes a lot of time for people to maintain their lawns and keep them nice. And most people don’t have the time to devote to it. That’s where you can help them. Although this business tends to be more seasonal in some climates, you can generate enough revenue during the warm months to support yourself. Offer a variety of services, including lawn maintenance, seeding, aeration, grub control and shrubbery and tree maintenance. Start the business from scratch or consider purchasing a low-cost franchise with a company like Lawn Doctor.

Commercial Cleaning

Start cleaning buildings for a living. Specialize in specific types of venues such as schools, hotels, banks, car dealerships or even manufacturing facilities. Start from scratch or purchase an inexpensive franchise through a commercial cleaning company. Most will help secure accounts for you. You can then hire people to clean for you as you expand your number of locations.

Painting Houses

In most states, you don’t need a license to paint people’s homes, according to Small Business Trends. Start with indoor painting as you don’t need as much equipment. If you need some experience, start out by working for someone else until you hone your skills. You can also watch online videos to learn various tricks of the trade. House painting is one business you can start by going door to door, but you can also hand out business cards to exude a more professional image.

Garage Cleaning/Organizing Service

People’s garages are usually the most disorganized sections of their homes. And you can do them a great service by cleaning and organizing them. This business costs very little to operate, but you’ll need a good push broom and cleaning supplies to get started, according to Business Insider. Distribute fliers or go door to door to procure your first few clients. The key to getting business is to be polite and offer reasonable rates.

 

by: Dennis Hung