Sometimes, the idea of starting to work with technology is overwhelming. Maybe you’ve never coded before, or you haven’t even begun figuring out social media. To you, the internet might be a completely foreign world where people speak a totally different language. Sometimes it may feel like that. Some other readers may believe that they know most things about technology but always want to learn a little bit more. Either way, this article is for you. I’ll be discussing some simple, helpful ways to start doing new things with technology, whether you’re at the very beginning or not.

1. YouTube

YouTube is one of the best learning platforms ever, especially for the average person. It’s free and has instructions for essentially anything you could ever want to do, technology included. With an excellent video platform and options to download and save videos for later, YouTube is one of the most user-friendly programs. Unfortunately, it can sometimes be difficult to find what you’re looking for (in the language that you speak). Also, keep in mind that the people creating videos may not be trained in education and may have a difficult time explaining things in terms that you understand.

2. App Development

App development requires a lot more than just coding skills. Some app developers need help coming up with creative app ideas or need help testing and adjusting current ones. If you’ve ever wondered, “what should I do if I have an app idea but no programming skills,” there is still hope for you. Do your research and figure out how to make your ideas come alive even if you don’t have the coding skills yet.

3. edX

Created by Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, edX is an open online course provider. There are no admissions to worry about, and some courses are free. Many online courses are offered with paid certification options. You could have a certification in front-end web development or data science in less than a year through these programs.

4. Khan Academy

Essentially a more educational and organized form of YouTube, Khan Academy offers courses spanning a wide variety of topics. Their coding videos are appropriate for any age group and friendly for all levels of technology learners. Khan Academy focuses on making sure that users have a thorough and comfortable understanding of concepts.

5. LinkedIn Learning

Formerly lynda.com, LinkedIn Learning offers a wide variety of courses in creative, business, and software skills. Their learning software primarily relies on videos from professionals. LinkedIn Learning does require a subscription, but certificates of course completion can be received at no further cost.

6. Pluralsight

Pluralsight teaches both individual and business customers. They also use videos to teach technology and software skills. They focus on hands-on learning and IT skills. Pluralsight also offers certification. Their pricing is comparable to LinkedIn Learning costs. Overall, the two seem fairly similar although Pluralsight seems to place greater emphasis on technology skills.

7. WordPress

WordPress allows people without any coding experience to create visually appealing websites for businesses, blogs, and whatever else you need. They focus on sleek, interactive designs that encourage discussion and keep your web pages active. WordPress is friendly for all levels of learning, and it can be used by the latest of technology adapters without fear.

8. Take It Slow

The goal is to keep learning technological skills without getting discouraged. Don’t give up because those around you may seem to know more. It’s impossible to know absolutely everything about technology because it is constantly evolving. Instead, figure out what you enjoy and specialize in that.

Ultimately, technological literacy will come over time through practice. Don’t be afraid to try new things and experiment. You have new ideas that no one has ever hard before, so figure out a way to make those ideas marketable and to make them happen. Everything is changing so quickly, there’s always a chance for you to get on board.

by: Dennis Hung