If you look up the market share of technological products, the biggest chunk of the pie-chart is dominated by smartphones. These mobile devices have taken over the world in sweeping fashion and their pace is only gaining with time. Much of the ‘smart-phone explosion’ occurred in early 2000’s.

The question is how smartphone became such a landslide in popularity that they took over computers, laptops and even conventional mobile phones. The reason is convenience, performance and utility became extremely numerous once the first generations of smartphones were released. This created a tsunami of consumers who were lining up to buy smartphones instead of computers. In the following points, we explain how this happened in detail by covering each of the significant hardware additions to the smartphones.

Touchscreen

It’s hard to imagine a smartphone without a touchscreen, but this was inconceivable with earlier phone. Many business level phones hosted large mechanical keyboards, and many thought that would be the height of the mobile interface. However, that all changed when the first smartphones were released that hosted touchscreens.

All of a sudden, interacting with your display completely blew the lid open to all the possibilities with your phone. Applications that require precision and clicking finally became a reality and by making the users free of the need for buttons, smartphones became what they are today.

Dual Core Processors

Phones have always lagged behind computers in terms of performance. When Intel developed Pentium Atom, many thought that would be the end of processor development, but they made a ground breaking improvement with multicore processors.

Dual core processors were soon introduced to the market, and they were the key in driving the smartphone revolution. The reason for this was that dual core processors, unlike their single core counterparts, were able to pack almost 4 times the performance while maintaining their small size. This was ideal for smartphones that demanded both compactness and performance both at the same time. Smartphones were, from there onwards, a legitimate contender to computers in terms of performance; so many users bought them as a replacement for their laptops and PCs.

Internet mobility was a big issue for cellular phones. It was difficult to bring a robust coverage for phones as internet demands stability as well as a large band witch that most phone antennas just couldn’t handle.  Internets were thought to be unreachable for phones, but 3G changed that notion. 3G’s reliable range as well as throughput made them ideal for phones. Many consumers felt that smartphones could even outmatch computers as even they don’t provide mobile internet.

Finally, the nail in the coffin for laptops was the development of state of the art cameras. Until the introduction of cameras in phones that exceeded 7-10 mega pixels, many consumers bought separate cameras and even relied on laptop webcams. But the recent breakthrough in optics made it possible to fit ultra-small photo lenses in smartphones that made them into better cameras than even dedicated devices.

At this point, consumers felt there was absolutely no reason not to guy smartphones. Not only did they provide equal to or greater performance than laptop computers, they were even replacing other external devices like cameras and music players.

 

 

Author Bio: Ellie Grace has authored this article, as well as many others on Hirepaperwriter.com Her passion for technology stems from her fascination with how people have changed with new machines. The sociological impact of hardware and software is only something we have witnessed recently, and she wishes to document all of it. You can read more of her articles that cover the history of many current technology, from their inception to their paramount development.